Warren Buffett just said he doesn’t own bitcoin because ‘it isn’t going to do anything’ — he’d rather own these 2 productive assets instead

Despite its recent pullback, bitcoin has soared by more than 2,000% over the past five years. But while the world’s largest crypto coin has clearly hit the mainstream, one prominent investor remains critical of the opportunity: Warren Buffett.

At the Berkshire Hathaway annual shareholders meeting on Saturday, Buffett said that while he doesn’t know whether bitcoin will go up or down going forward, he’s pretty sure that “it doesn't produce anything.”

And that’s why the Oracle of Omaha doesn’t own the asset.

“If you told me you own all of the bitcoin in the world and you offered it to me for $25, I wouldn’t take it because what would I do with it?” he asks. “I’d have to sell it back to you one way or another. It isn’t going to do anything.”

To put that in perspective, bitcoin currently trades at over $38,000 a piece.


While criticizing bitcoin, Buffett touched on two assets that he would buy if given the opportunity.

Sign up for our MoneyWise newsletter to receive a steady flow of actionable ideas from Wall Street's top firms.

Farmland

Agriculture and bitcoin don’t have much in common. Bitcoin was created in 2009 while agricultural communities began to form about 10,000 years ago.

Buffett isn’t known for being an agricultural investor, but he sees value in an asset class that’s critical to the sector — farmland. His point is if you buy farmland, you hold a tangible asset that produces food.

“If you said, for a 1% interest in all the farmland in the United States, pay our group $25 billion, I’ll write you a check this afternoon,” Buffett says.

Of course, you don’t need to have $25 billion to invest in U.S. farmland. Publicly traded real estate investment trusts — that specialize in owning farms — allow you to do it with as little money as you’re willing to spend.

Gladstone Land (LAND), for instance, owns 164 farms totaling 113,000 acres. It pays monthly distributions of $0.0454 per share, giving the stock an annual dividend yield of 1.5%.

Then there’s Farmland Partners (FPI), a REIT with a farmland portfolio of 186,000 acres and an annual dividend yield of 1.4%.


Previous Post Next Post